Thursday, April 2, 2015

Big Sur Writers Conference Review (Andrea Brown Literary Agency)

OVERVIEW:

After the Tennessee Writer’s Workshop, I was eager to go to the Big Sur Writers Conference. I wasn’t excited about the long trip to California though. The ladies at Andrea Brown Literary Agency (ABLA) recently announced they were branching out with a new conference in Denver. So it’s a little closer, but I hope one day they may make it to the East Coast. The reason why I care is because the conference was great. But I’m getting ahead of myself.

Big Sur is located about 150 miles below San Francisco. When the paperwork told me it would take 3 and a half hours to get there, it was 100% accurate. While California’s highway/Interstate system is no reflection on the conference, California could use a bit of improvement to speed things along. In Georgia, 150 miles means 2 hours.

Because of available flights, I arrived at the conference exactly one hour late. I missed much of the introductions. However, Magnus Toren noticed me walk in and immediately caught me up on what I needed to do and where I needed to go. Within ten minutes, I was ready.

Immediately after the introductions, we are all sent to our first group meeting. Big Sur schedules two groups of four to five authors that you will meet with two times over the course of the conference.

Fr Ex: You will be assigned to a Group A and a Group B. (There will likely be Groups A-M) Group A may have 4 authors and Group B may have 5. You’ll meet with Group A for 2 hours after the introductions but before dinner. For me that was Friday at 3:30PM til 5:30PM. After dinner, you’ll return to your room to perform rewrites or just enjoy yourself in whatever you like. (There is no TV, WiFi, or Cell Phone Signal, so bring a book. ;-) ) The next morning you have breakfast, meet with Group B, have lunch, improve your work, meet with Group A again, then Dinner and more writing. On the final day, you meet with group B in the morning, have lunch, then depart. Twice there were other one hour programs where you could ask the editors who were a part of the conference questions and/or ask about query letters.

Each of the groups will have one professional person in them: an agent, author, or editor. I had one author and one agent. In the sessions, you’ll read from your work approx. 3 to 7 pages because of time. Then for 15 to 20 minutes the group and the professional will discuss the work. For me this was extremely helpful. While I’m a part of a writer’s group and I’ve had my work read by over 20 people, I had never had a professional give me feedback. There is a huge difference in vision. While a beta reader/group reader has insight (generally into the story), they are also patient. I’ve learned that an average beta will give me over 10 chapters to get into the story (my chapters are small for MG). But an agent makes up their mind in 3-5 pages most of the time. So I needed to know what I was doing wrong and how to fix it.

Unfortunately, your group members may not be writing in the same age group. This is where the largest problem for me personally came where one PB writer just couldn’t get into my story and had major problems with it while the other MG and YA writers had no problems at all. For the same PB writer, I had little to no words of help because I don’t write nor read PB. So we clashed slightly, but not in a way in which either one of us was rude, just that we didn’t have much helpful advice. (The groups encourage everyone to comment about everyone else’s work. So we both felt compelled to say something.)

I personally took every opportunity to improve my manuscript. So after each session I spent at least 90 minutes updating my first 3-10 pages. You don’t have to do this. Many writers did no updates at all and just reread their unchanged work in their Group B to make sure that Group B had similar opinions to Group A. Remember, you’re getting the opinions of both fellow authors and professionals. So depending on how much weight you give one of your fellow authors vs the professionals will determine how you may want to precede. You can also bring multiple projects which some people did.  In that way you can read one project to your Group A and another to your Group B.


MEALS:

All of the meals were prepared in a restaurant which is a part of the Big Sur Campgrounds. The food was good. The food was prepared buffet style and care was taken to make sure there were Gluten Free options. Most of the professionals were friendly, but I’ll admit it was like being nine years old again and trying to find a place to sit on the bus. At the first meal, the guy authors crowed one side of the room while the women were on the other side. (Very preteen of us) By the time we made it to breakfast, friends were starting to develop, and I could tell groups of people had come to the conference together. The professionals don’t come up to you and make sure that you are okay. They look for places to sit like everyone else and if there is a vacant spot they sit with you. Sometimes they sit with their friends, but not always. (There did seem to be two “agency tables” though. Back to middle grade. LOL) I sat with three authors at one meal, and two agents at two other meals. Everyone was super nice. So there weren’t any issues, just a few awkward moments that can’t be helped.

 
 
ACCOMODATIONS:

The accommodations consists of cabins, either one room or two rooms. Some authors chose to save money by signing up to share a two room cabin. If you do decide to share, the cabins are huge and the rooms are more than large enough. I decided to pay extra for my own cabin because for one I was coming from the East Coast which means my morning would be different than an another author who may be coming from the West Coast. Also I’m a light sleeper and I didn’t want to have someone making coffee, stomping around, and typing in the morning or late at night when I would be sleeping.

Each cabin feels like a tiny townhouse complete with a kitchen, pots, and dishes (cups, silverware, plates). I barely used the kitchen except to make Breakfast Tea to wake me up. (I don’t drink coffee)  If you are going to drink Coffee/Tea grab sugar/creamer/tea bags at the meals at the restaurant because the kitchen only has a few items and mine had no real sugar but sweet-n-low and Splenda. I was lucky I had some sugar in my bag from the trip up. Also bring a few snacks to have in the room. You won’t have time to go shopping, so if you get the nibbles you’ll need something to tide you over. And for me, I was waking up 3 hours before everyone because my brain was on Eastern Standard Time.

The cabins had one central heating source which seemed to be gas. If you turned it on, a small furnace like thing would ignite and heat the area around it. It heats up slowly. If you want to have a warm cabin turn this on before dinner. If you like it cold then adjust it accordingly. There was no air conditioning that I could find, but there was a fan in my room. Many of the Group meetings are also done in the cabins and for cooling the Group professionals just opened the doors and windows. For the time of year, it was comfortable. At night it was cool, so I found myself doing my writing three feet from the furnace.

My cabin also had a great sky light. When I lay in the bed I could see the stars – beautiful.

As I said earlier, there is no WiFi or Cellphone signal. In some areas around the campsite, I was able to get one bar out of five. This caused many people to be distressed as family members may have not known that you have made it safely, especially if like me, you’re coming from far away. I encourage you before you get to highway 1 to stop somewhere and make a phone call to let your family know you are safe.  The lack of cell signal helps you focus on your writing which is not a bad thing. You’re not going to get random calls in the middle of the night or check email. I did find that in times when few people were up (mornings) I could send texts easily as long as they were short. My phone also received most of the reply texts around that time, even if they were a day old.


SUMMARY:

The conference is geared more toward those with complete projects or near complete. I was able to get a lot of great feedback because my project is technically finished. Many budding authors had portions of a manuscript some as small as ten pages in total. Several had a rough draft but hadn’t sent it to Alpha or Beta Readers yet. This was a costly mistake for them since the conference is not cheap and while the professionals were helpful, it would be impossible for them to fix all the problems with such a young manuscript within the timeframe.

 
The only conference improvement would be to extend the time from 48 hours (Friday midday to Sunday midday) to 72 hours. I don’t think a weeklong conference is needed especially for authors who are following most of the “undefined” rules of writing. But having an agent’s listening ear is not an easy thing to come by. And while many retreats do give you this option, the size of ABLA gives you more opportunity to have an agent or a professional that works closely with these agents. I’ve read about a few retreats were agents show up only for half a day or less  which is much different than having an agent read the work, allow the chance for revision, and have them read it again with comment. For me, that alone was worth the price.

All in all I loved the conference. I would encourage everyone I know to go without hesitation. The only thing I’d warn anyone about is just making sure that you are ready. But if you are solidly on Draft 2 of your PB/MG/YA book then the ladies and friends of ABLA are a great gem among the conferences and writer’s retreats.

Wednesday, February 18, 2015

Tennessee Writer’s Workshop Review (Chuck Sambuchino Workshops)

Now that I’m over two years into the Author World, I felt it was important to start going to workshops and conferences. My first conference was the Tennessee Writer’s Workshop which is the equivalent to the Kentucky Writer’s workshop and lots of others in which Chuck Sambuchino is the primary instructor. I researched for a few weeks discovering information on the conference before I went because as many budding authors, money doesn’t grow between the pages of a book. (Unless you’re a NY Times Best Selling Author – which I’m unfortunately not yet.)  So I decided that it would be good to review the conference to give others an understanding of what they can expect if they attend the conference. When I registered, I also signed up to talk with two agents.

 
A few days before the conference I received an email from the conference organizers. It listed the overall schedule, my agent appointment schedule, and a few other things about the conference including twitter hashtag. I drove up to Nashville the night before. In the morning, I arrived at the hotel 90 minutes before the conference so I could go over my pitch.

Soon, people were arriving, and we were ushered into a conference room. Chuck came in and introduced himself and passed out information on the items he was going to review. He was very thorough speaking about both Traditional and Non-Traditional publishing (Self-Publishing).  He went into the pros and cons of both, listed resources, and even discussed his own publishing history. He also spoke on building a platform, networking, and many aspects of the modern author.

In the midst of his lectures, agents received pitches from new authors. So the formula was five to fifteen minutes before you pitch, you would get up and exit the conference room. Then you would tell the pitch organizer that you were there and immediately at the time appointed, you would enter and give your pitch. Afterward you’d thank the agent and return to your seat in the lecture.

There were six agents at this particular conference with four focusing on Middle Grade / YA. This varies among Chuck Sambuchino’s other conferences. Some lean more toward Romance, others toward New Adult, or what have you. It seems that many of the agents to these events are local to the area in which the event occurs, which is both good and bad. It’s great to have local people, but many times local people may not represent the type of book that you write. So take this into consideration.

Chuck went over almost everything I had studied online. I’m an avid researcher. So I knew about 85-90% of what he had to offer which means that someone who does their research may not get as much out of the presentation. However, one thing he spoke about that is true is that much of the information you receive on the Internet is not accurate. It can be difficult to weed through the tangle of information. So having him to clarify what was useful and what was not was worth the time and money in my opinion.

Like many workshops, retreats, conferences, he spent an hour reading twenty or so first pages. Authors were instructed to print out six copies of their first page and he would read aloud them while the agents read to themselves. I was lucky enough to get my page read, so it was great for me to get feedback on my work. (Chuck couldn’t be responsible for any opinions of agents who spoke either for or against a work.)  However, this is the only area in which I think could be improved. But I say that lightly because I don’t think that is the purpose of this particular workshop.


So in Summary, I give Chuck Sambuchino’s workshops a 9 out of 10. This is a great workshop for budding authors, those interested in getting on the publishing road (right before self-publishing or traditional publishing), those who recently got an agent, and those interested in pitching to an agent. This workshop is not for those who want to learn more about what they may be doing wrong in their writing or who want to work out the kinks in their writing. This is a definite recommend for anyone who is navigating the publishing world especially those who research very little.
 

On the Pitch Sessions:

Many workshops and conferences have pitch sessions. I think the average time is ten-fifteen minutes per pitch. I didn’t enjoy this process at all. I’m a pretty outspoken guy. While I can have shy spells, I have no problem in any business-like conversation.

The pitches run like the following: An author walks over and sits down to speak to an agent. General formalities occur, as in “Hello my name is…” Afterward, the author recites the pitch/query of their book along with the word count, series potential, and comparable titles. Then questions are asked on both sides to see if a possible fit occurs.

The problem I had with the pitches was in the way that it happens. In my opinion the positioning is too close, the environment was too open (others around you are pitching as well), and the time limit makes for odd speed-ups and silences. Also it helps to have a page of information memorized (i.e. the pitch) which is difficult to do with a person trying to look interested because they are literally three feet in front of you.

 
I’m not sure how to make this better and make it economical for the workshop. I think I would have almost preferred just to get up in front of all the agents at once and just pitch, but I’m sure for many that would have been more nerve racking. At least this way more agents could hear at once, more people could pitch, and the odd closeness would be eliminated.  There are those who hate public speaking and I’m sure this new formula would be the horrid for them.

I’ll admit that if I had to do it again, I probably would. But I’m definitely not looking forward to it, even though I did have one extremely nice agent who guided me through the process.

Friday, February 6, 2015

A Workshopping I Will Go ...

I haven’t written any posts in a while. That’s because I’ve been working steadily on Book 1.5 and Book 2. I’ve also been preparing for my first writer’s workshop. Last year I regretted not going to two conferences/workshops that were in driving distance. So in 2015, I decided to take the plunge.

 
This weekend I’ll be attending the Tennessee Writer’s Workshop.  Dragoncon is a different animal. Yes, it has a writer’s track in it; and yes agents and editors come, but it’s more panel information. I’m really excited because I’ve never been to just a writer’s workshop or talked to an agent face to face. After the Tennessee Workshop, I’ll be going to Big Sur which is a three-day workshop in which they sit down and analyze at your work. I think both of these will be great for me.

Workshops can be expensive especially if you don’t live around a central hub like New York or California. In Georgia we get few conferences and those that are neighboring are a 4 to 6 hour drive. The biggest problem I’ve personally had is that many of the conferences feature agents that are into Southern/ Christian Romance or quirky light-hearted MG. THE MESSENGERS is Middle Grade Sci-Fi which is about as far as you can get from that.

 
I’m hoping to learn enough to make some changes and then maybe I can grab an agent that might be interested in a Sci-Fi version of ALEX RIDER or RANGER’S APPRENTICE. My writer’s group, betas, and other people who have assisted me think I may be close. But no matter what happens this year, I’m excited about writing and that my dear readers is the most important thing. :-)

If you’re looking for workshops in your area Vonna Carter has a great website with links to conferences. http://vonnacarter.com/

Wednesday, December 31, 2014

End of Year Wrap Up

Another glorious year has graced us with its presence and now it’s gone forever, only existing in our memories. This year was a blessing for me. Although I did go through some sad times, the happy more than outweighed the bad. I finalized DAWN OF SHADOWS (Messengers 1.0) this year. While I hesitate to ever say any project is completely finished, it’s done enough for me to move on.





Unfortunately, life slowed my process on the other projects I’m working on; but CRIMSON RENEGADE (Messengers 1.5) and CITY OF ILLUSIONS (Messengers 2.0) are close to the tipping point. For me there is always that sweet spot about 65% of the way through a book when it no longer is hard to write it, but hard not to finish it.

The Short Film has changed names (at least for now) and it is almost finished. There were some unforeseen difficulties in that situation as well, but those issues will stay in 2014 and not pass into 2015.

This year will bring about the completion of Books 1.5 and 2 and hopefully at least one more. I also plan to work on the first official trailer. While the short film is great to get interest, it’s still not a true trailer to the story in DAWN OF SHADOWS.


I helped (or hope I helped) about 12 people directly through Beta Reading for them, and met a lot of great people in the SCWBI community and twitter middle grade communities. It’s fun to struggle with friends instead of by yourself. (LOL)  I’m positive that 2015 will be a turning point for the series. If my own betas who have read DAWN OF SHADOWS are any indication, I should be able to find a home for the project soon. I also was fortunate to participate in four twitter pitch parties and several online writer contests. It was a great experience for me.


I hope that everyone can find peace, love, and excitement in 2015 doing the thing that they love and caring for those around them. Now it’s time to get back to work. 

Monday, November 17, 2014

Writing Basics – Plotting II – Getting Down and Dirty with My Antag



This weekend I put aside some time to start into Book 2 of THE MESSENGERS. Autumn (one of my characters) has been pestering me about continuing with the series, especially since she has a little more page-time in this book. After a few words – oh maybe 20 of them – I recognized that I was going nowhere fast. Generally on good writing days I can knock out 1000-3000 words.  And sometimes I’ll run out of time for the day, but will put in another set the next day, and the next until 15,000 words are in the computer smiling back at me.

But I was looking at 20, and they weren’t smiling. They were laughing. They did that low rumble in the stomach to a full shrill burst-over-the-top pointing at you gut buster. So I did what I always do – Take a walk.
 



Walking frees my mind and helps me to unwind. Unfortunately it was 50 degrees outside, fortunately it wasn’t the 40 degrees that the weather people said it would be a few days prior. As I was going along, it dawned on me. My Antag was staring at me with one eye brow raised in the air and a palm turned up. “What’s my motivation?” My Antag asked. That’s why I was stuck. ( Read about the importance of Antag’s here.)

Now came the hard part, the reasoning of the bad behavior. Was the Antag mistreated? Unloved? Too loved? Did they run into problems early in life? Will their feelings be a surprise maybe even to them? Why do they hate? And hate so much to hurt another human being or system? (Remember you can hate and go into a shell – like many Red Herrings do.)


After three miles, I understood the motivation. Basically what I came up with was that … Hold on, I’m not telling. You have to wait for the book. :-)  I made it home and turned on my computer. It was time to do more homework – yes  more homework. I spent the rest of the day looking up everything from pictures of actors to fashion styles to weapons. I need to know what my Antag looks like, and how they plan to do their deed. Once I was satisfied, I went to watch the Indianapolis Colts lose to New England Patriots. Yes I watch football, and yes I wanted the Colts to win.



I took a break to let my brain breathe and let my subconscious create the character. I need for my Antag to talk to me in a voice just as strong as the Protag. In fact, I prefer that it’s stronger. Once that process is complete, I can rework any problems in the master plan to destroy/takeover. While I’m doing this, I try not to consider my Protag much at all. It doesn’t matter what they can and cannot do. What matters is what makes since for the Antag.  Once that’s done, we call in a mediator for the Antag and Protag to work through any issues and finalize the plotting of the Antag’s scheme.
So let’s use Felicia’s Antag from the last blog post – Mr. Furrytails.

Mr. Furrytails is a simple guy. He wants power and money. He’s currently working on a deal to remove two groups of werewolves from the city. He believes that if he can get rid of them, it’ll open up more commerce for his team to control. But to make this power move is risky and could cost him his life. But if it works, He’ll control all of the assets from Atlanta to Savannah to Williamsburg to Jacksonville. Basically all of the major trade in Georgia and the Carolinas.

When he finds out about Felicia, he doesn’t want much. He just wants her to come and pledge her allegiance to him. She’ll now be one of the many “controllable” powers in his territory. But Felicia’s mom gets in the way and that is a problem. The last thing he needs is anyone throwing off the balance of power or worse tipping off the heads of the Were-Families he’s working against.
So how does this show up in your book?

We know Furrytails attitude.
We know where he’s going to be and what he’s trying to do.
We know how many henchmen he’ll need to do the work.
We know his contacts.
We know his strengths – in resources and otherwise.
We know enough about him for his to affect our Protag.

Now that I know where my Antag will be and what they will be doing. I know how they affect the Protag(s). This movement of the Antag forces the hand of the Protag which creates story.  Hope this helps someone. Thanks a bunch for reading.